Diversity and Inclusion

Last updated: 1 July 2016

Reflecting, valuing and understanding the communities we serve.

Our objective is State services that have New Zealanders current and future needs and wellbeing at the heart of our operations.

We are taking a collective effort at being better at working together across agencies, to focus on delivering what will benefit New Zealand and New Zealanders.

Public Service chief executives have made a commitment to a shared vision for diversity and inclusion in the State services. We have already made a start, and will work progressively to widen and deepen our approach to diversity and inclusion.

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Auckland is now one of the most diverse
cities in the world and the trend towards
greater diversity is accelerating.

Composition of New Zealand’s population and projection

  2015 2038
Maori 15.6% 19.5%
Asian 12.2% 19.5%
Pacific 7.8% 10.9%
Other 64.4% 50.1%
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The Public Service Pay Gap

14%

Gender pay gap

44.2%

Senior leaders who are women

16% of the Public Service is estimated to have a disability, based on 2013 Census data, compared to 19% across the entire workforce

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Key issues:

  • Narrow Public Service careers
  • Wellington-centric Public Services
  • Insufficient positive role models for people from different ethnicities/cultures
  • Unconscious bias in recruitment/selection
  • Women not well represented in leadership pipeline
  • Variable trust in government across different social groups

Diversity and Inclusion in the Public sector

We recognise that as New Zealand’s State services, we need to value, reflect and understand the communities we serve.

To do this, we are growing our leaders and our talent to produce a more diverse and inclusive workforce and workplaces. We will work alongside other government agencies to collaborate on diversity and inclusion issues, as well as support chief executives in delivering a diverse and inclusive State sector.

Developing a more diverse workforce is not just about ethnicity. Diversity involves gender, age, disability, sexual orientation, education, national origin, and religion. Diversity encompasses a broad spread of experience, culture, perspective and lifestyle of those who live in New Zealand.

Similarly, developing State services that are inclusive ensures our people and the people we work with and for feel valued, supported, and respected. We are committed to building a culture where New Zealanders can achieve their full potential.

Our priority work

Our priorities are developing the following areas, so that we can meet the future and current needs of New Zealanders better:

  • leadership and talent
  • flexible work initiatives
  • diverse and inclusive recruitment and supply
  • inclusive workplaces
  • Communities of Practice
  • information and analytics.

We will be working to develop specific initiatives for each of the above priorities. 

Resources

As part of our work towards ensuring a more diverse and inclusive State sector, we have developed a number of resources, often in collaboration with others.

These resources include:

This annual report provides a snap-shot of the people who make up the Public Service in 2015. There is also some additional information on timely topics, including diversity and inclusion, flexible working, and leadership development.

This toolkit has been developed by the Ministry of Social Development, with the support of SSC. It aims to assist Public Service employers to create more inclusive environments for employing more disabled people.  

  • Mental Health Foundation: mental health in the workplace toolkits
    • Mental Health in the Workplace – Employee
    • Mental Health in the Workplace – Manager
    • Mental Health in the Workplace – Organisation

This toolkit has been developed by the Mental Health Foundation with support from SSC and other Public Service agencies. It aims to improve the capability of agencies when it comes to working with mental health issues.

The Positive Workplace Behaviours guidance has been developed in collaboration with the Public Service Association (PSA) and provides good practice examples to State services on how the standards of integrity and conduct should be applied at agency, leadership and staff levels.

Diversity and Inclusion Network

We co-ordinate a Diversity and Inclusion Network for people from the State sector to discuss key diversity and inclusion issues, share best practice, and keep informed of new initiatives and resources.

The Network aims to meet every two months, and covers a wide-variety of diversity topics.

The Network helps to shape the work we are doing around ensuring our State services have New Zealanders’ current and future needs at the centre.

Our key partners

We partner with a range of lead agencies from across the Public Service, as well as organisations from beyond the Public Service to progress our work on diversity and inclusion:

The Office for Disability Issues is the focal point within government on disability issues.

The Office of Ethnic Communities is the focal point within government on valuing and including ethnic communities.

The Human Rights Commission responds to and resolves human rights complaints.

The Ministry for Women is the government’s principal advisor on achieving better outcomes for women in New Zealand.

The Ministry for Pacific Peoples is the Crown’s principal advisor on policies and interventions that improve outcomes for Pacific peoples.

As the name implies, Te Puni Kokiri seeks to harness the collective talents of Māori to produce a stronger New Zealand.

The Office for Seniors is actively promoting a society where people can age positively, be supported in their communities, and have the same opportunities as everyone.

Although Statistics New Zealand does not have a direct focus on diversity and inclusion, the information they steward informs better decision-making around diversity and inclusion.

This webpage will develop over time as our work on diversity and inclusion in the Public Service progresses. 

Contact

diversity.inclusion@ssc.govt.nz